The writer has been MIA

I’ve been MIA as I’ve been working one weekend after the next then having commitments at SG’s school for volunteering and Teacher Appreciation Week.  If you know a teacher – give them a high five.  They work hard..  I still have one more weekend crop I’m doing this weekend and the end of the school year to get through.   Anyway…

Lauren has been posting some amazing pictures up in FB and on this blog.  She’s traveling with Green Beard who entertains her freely with songs.  They pace is good and they are in Virginia now.  I need to reset the trip guide to more accurately reflect her pace.  Since March, she’s been through 3 states (Georgia, North Carolina, Tennasee) and now in her 4th state on the East Coast.  Such a big difference from the PCT where they spent the first few months in California.

virginia_ref_2001

The terrain changes daily as you move up the hills and down to the valleys in this area.  As Lauren heads into Virginia, we do have some good friends who are willing to be trail angels should she/they need assistance.  She’s headed into the Roanoke area of Virginia.

cent-va-at

A bit of information about this area from Wikipedia:

Geography

Location of Roanoke, Virginia

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 42.9 square miles (111.1 km2), of which 42.5 square miles (110.1 km2) is land and 0.3 square miles (0.8 km2) (0.8%) is water.[14]

Roanoke is located in the valley and ridge province of Virginia immediately west of the Blue Ridge Mountains and east of the Allegheny Mountains

Within the city limits is Mill Mountain, which stands detached from surrounding ranges. Its summit features the Roanoke Star, Mill Mountain Zoo, the Discovery Center interpretive building, and an overlook of the Roanoke Valley. The Appalachian Trail runs through the northern section of Roanoke County several miles north of the city, while the Blue Ridge Parkway runs just to the south of the city. Carvins Cove, the second-largest municipal park in America at 12,700-acre (51 km2), lies in northeast Roanoke County and southwest Botetourt County.[15] Smith Mountain Lake is several miles southeast of the city. The Jefferson National Forest is nearby. Roanokers and visitors to the area enjoy hiking, mountain biking, cross-country running, canoeing, kayaking, fly fishing, and other outdoor pursuits.

The city is located in the North Fork of Roanoke winemaking region. The “North Fork of Roanoke” appellation is a designated American Viticultural Area, recognizing the unique grape growing conditions present in the area. Valhalla Vineyards is located just outside the city limits of Roanoke.

The Roanoke River flows through the city of Roanoke. Some stretches of the river flow through parks and natural settings, while others flow through industrial areas. Several tributaries join the river in the city, most notably Peters Creek, Tinker Creek, and Mud Lick Creek.

Climate

Though located along the Blue Ridge Mountains at elevations exceeding 900 ft (270 m), Roanoke lies in the humid subtropical climate zone (Köppen Cfa), with four distinct, but generally mild, seasons; it is located in USDA hardiness zone 7b, with the suburbs falling in zone 7a.[16] Extremes in temperature have ranged from 105 °F (41 °C) as recently as August 21, 1983 down to −12 °F (−24 °C) on December 30, 1917, though neither 100 °F (38 °C) nor 0 °F (−18 °C) is reached in most years; the most recent occurrence of each is July 8, 2012 and February 20, 2015.[17] More typically, the area records an average of 7.7 days where the temperature stays at or below freezing and 25 days with 90 °F (32 °C)+ highs annually.[17] The normal monthly mean temperature ranges from 36.6 °F (2.6 °C) in January to 76.7 °F (24.8 °C) in July.[17]

Based on the 1981−2010 period, the city averages 16.6 inches (42 cm) of snow per winter.[18] Roanoke experienced something of a snow drought in the 2000s until December 2009 when 17 inches (43 cm) of snow fell on Roanoke in a single storm.[19] Winter snowfall has ranged from trace amounts in 1918–19 and 1919–20 to 62.7 inches (159 cm) in 1959–60;[17] the largest single storm dumped approximately three feet (0.9 m) from December 16−18, 1890.[20]

Flooding is the primary weather-related hazard faced by Roanoke. Heavy rains, most frequently from remnants of a hurricane, drain from surrounding areas to the narrow Roanoke Valley. The most recent significant flood was in the fall of 2004, caused by the remains of Hurricane Ivan. The most severe[citation needed] flooding in the city’s history occurred on November 4, 1985 when heavy storms from the remnants of Hurricane Juan stalled over the area. Ten people drowned in the Roanoke Valley, and others were saved by rescue personnel.

Many residents complain that they are prone to allergies because of pollen from trees in the surrounding mountains. Most famously, the family of Wayne Newton moved from Roanoke to the dry climate of Phoenix, Arizona because of his childhood asthma and allergies.[21] However, there have not been clinical studies to establish that these conditions are more prevalent in Roanoke than in other cities with similar vegetation and climate. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roanoke,_Virginia )

The Calers will attest to the allergies in this region and how bad they can be!

Until next time,

~ Linda

 

 

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