Bennington, VT and everything in between

Lauren has reached Bennington, Vermont.  Jeff and SG were not able to meet her as planned due to all of our “normal” house sitters being unavailable to watch the Zoo!  Super sadness on SG’s part as well as Aunt Lauren.  Only 4 more weeks before we depart MD with Huck and Finn to meet her in Maine! She was able to go and pick up her food box and maps.  =)

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Some information about Bennington:

Bennington is a town in Bennington County, Vermont, in the United States. It is one of two shire towns (county seats) of the county, the other being Manchester.[4][5] The population is 15,431, as of 2014 US Census estimates.[6] Bennington is the most populous town in southern Vermont, the third-largest town in Vermont (after Essex and Colchester) and the sixth-largest municipality in the state including the cities of Burlington, Rutland, and South Burlington in the count.

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The town is home to the Bennington Battle Monument, which is the tallest human-made structure in the state of Vermont. The town has ready access to natural resources and waterpower, and a long history of manufacturing, primarily within wood processing. The town is also recognized nationally for its pottery, iron, and textiles. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bennington,_Vermont  )

A little backtracking.  Lauren’s been so good about posting on FB, that I have not felt the urgency to blog.  This being said, I love researching the areas she’s been.

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When reading about Bennington, I was sad to find out this information about the climate:

“Bennington experiences a humid continental climate (Köppen Dfb) with cold, snowy winters and warm to hot, humid summers. Snowfall can vary greatly from year to year. The town can experience snowfall as early as October and as late as April, and the surrounding high country can receive snow as late as May. Nor’easters often dump heavy snow and wind on the town during the winter, and accumulations of one foot of snow or greater are not uncommon when these storms move through the area…..July is typically the wettest month.” ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bennington,_Vermont).   Lauren is reaching VT in July so she may be headed into some more wet hiking.  =(

On to happier times:

Her last post on June 22 was this about her time in New York City:

“Kyle’s uncle Bear met us with the boat underneath the Bear Mt Bridge where we quickly chucked our packs onto the boat and jumped aboard from the rocks as we weren’t supposed to dock there. We then took the boat 35 miles down the Hudson River to New York City. Not many people get to enter the city this way and it provided a unique perspective of the city. We got to travel under the George Washington Bridge down to Manhattan, the World Trade Center and the Statue of Liberty.

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The original plan was to turn around at that point and head back to the trail but the city was calling our names. We got a wet slip in Brooklyn and ended up spending 2 more days exploring NYC. The first night we stayed in the financial district in lower Manhattan where we went to Wall St. and saw the bull. Kyle thought is was necessary to grab it’s balls.

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From there it was a short walk to The World Trade Center and Memorial.

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The next day we moved hotels to Time Square and I got to walk from lower Manhattan to Central Park. All in all I did about 12 miles that day. As I was making my way through the park a giant storm rolled through leaving me fairly wet and seeking shelter. Fortunately I had my poncho with me and refused to let the rain keep me from seeing the rest of the park. I even got to experience the subway as I was too tired to walk back down the park to the hotel.

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The following day I woke in Time Square and fell asleep on top of a mountain a few more miles north on the Appalachian Trail. What an adventure, I owe Kyle and is uncle a huge thanks for an experience of a lifetime!”

Two days before this, June 20, Lauren shares her experience with New York:

“I have had a real love hate experience with New York. It is quite beautiful, the best scenery so far but the terrain has been wearing me out. We have been rock climbing and scrambling over a ton of rock. Multiple times I have had to throw my trekking poles up and over these ledges so I can use both hands and feet to pull myself up.

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I loved the Bear Mountain area, it was so beautiful. The trees were spaced out with a grassy undergrowth and the granite slabs created an intriguing checked pattern. The vistas were finally worth walking out to and on a clear night sometimes you can get a glimpse of NYC. I particularly enjoyed the trail side zoo at the bottom of the mountain and gave a fair amount of thought to walking off with some of the picnickers food.

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We got off trail at mile 1404 and walked the 3.5 miles to the town of Fort Montgomery/ Highland Falls for a resupply and shower. We are planning on meeting Kyle’s great uncle here and taking his boat down the Hudson River to NYC. This should be an epic adventure.

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Lauren continues to embrace the journey.  As she moves on from Bennington, VT, the cell  service will continue to get worse, the terrain rougher, and the end of the trail closer.   We will hear less from her.

As I type this, I’m sitting in the SeaTac airport waiting for a connecting flight.  I’m going home from the CTMH Convention where the theme was “Who Tells Your Story” and resilience.  I’m blessed to have a chance to help Lauren tell her story and inspired by her resilience in her journey.

Until the next update,

~ Linda =)

 

 

~

 

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